Lineker joins line up to give lung cancer patients extra time

Linekar joins line up to give lung cancer patients extra time

LINEKER JOINS LINE-UP TO GIVE LUNG CANCER PATIENTS EXTRA TIME

Lung Cancer Awareness Month 1 – 30 November

The United Kingdom Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) is supporting a new Lung Cancer Awareness Month campaign being kicked off today (1 November, White Hart Lane Football Ground) by the former England football captain and sports presenter, Gary Lineker.

Together with health minister, Ann Keen, the soccer star will be urging people not to delay a visit to their GP if they think they may have any symptoms of lung cancer.

“The consequence of not seeking help could mean the difference between life and death,” says Dame Gill Oliver, chair of the UKLCC. “Early diagnosis is key and will substantially increase a patient’s chances of survival.”

The UK has one of the worst lung cancer survival rates in Europe.1  Currently, just a quarter of people with lung cancer in England (25%) will live for a year and less than one in ten (7% in England) will still be alive five years after diagnosis.2,3

Lung cancer kills over 33,000 people each year – more than breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer and leukaemia combined.4 Around 22,500 men and 15,200 women are diagnosed with lung cancer each year. 2 Half of all diagnosed will die within six months. 5

The main symptoms of lung cancer are: a persistent cough, or change to a longstanding cough; shortness of breath; coughing up phlegm with signs of blood; chest pain; loss of appetite; fatigue and weight loss.6

This is the sixth year of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, organised by Macmillan Cancer Support and The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation (RCLCF). Both charities are partners of the UKLCC, which is the UK’s largest multi-interest group in lung cancer.

Anyone wanting more information on lung cancer symptoms should call the Macmillan CancerLine on 0808 808 2020, The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation Helpline on 0800 358 7200 or the British Lung Foundation on 08458 50 50 20.

-ends-
Note to editors:-

The UK Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) is a powerful new coalition of the UK’s leading lung cancer experts, senior NHS and Department of Health professionals, charities and healthcare companies. It is the UK’s only multi-interest group in lung cancer and it is the first time that all the major charities with an interest in the disease have joined forces to fight lung cancer.  Its vision, as well as details of its financial and in-kind support, can be found on its website: www.uklcc.org.uk

  1. EUROCARE 3. Cancer survival in Europe: IARC, 2003 (Accessed 14 Suppl 5, at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14684501&query_hl=1.) and http://www.eurocare.it/
  2. http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/types/lung/incidence/
  3. One- and five-year survival of patients diagnosed in 1998-2001: 21 common cancers, sex and age, England. 2005. (Accessed at http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Expodata/Spreadsheets/D8982.xls)
  4. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/aboutcancer/statistics/mortality
  5. Cancer Research UK Statistics Dept
  6. http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=2964#general

For further information and interviews, please contact:- 
Lynsey Conway on 07778 304233 or email@lynseyconway.co.uk

 

MPs unite to double lung cancer survival

Lung Cancer Awareness Month 1 – 30 November

MPs from all sides of the political spectrum have joined forces with UK lung cancer experts to double lung cancer survival.

The UK has one of the worst lung cancer survival rates in Europe1 and only just under four percent (3.9%) of the current NHS cancer research budget is dedicated to lung cancer,2 despite being the UK’s biggest cancer killer.3

Parliamentarians such at Frank Dobson, the former health secretary and MP for Holborn and St Pancras, and Anne Milton, MP for Guildford and member of the Health Select Committee, are working with the United Kingdom Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) to urge Government to improve the lives of lung cancer victims who are generally less empowered than other cancer patients and often unfairly stigmatized. 

“More women die from lung cancer than breast cancer3 and one in eight cases of lung cancer are among people who have never smoked,4”says Dr Mick Peake, chair of the UKLCC and NHS national clinical lead for lung cancer. “Yet lung cancer continues to suffer from a postcode lottery. We want to put the disease in the political and media spotlight.”

Currently, you are four times more likely to survive lung cancer in some parts of the country than others.5

According to the UKLCC, thousands of lives can be saved over the next ten years by doubling current survival rates. Currently, just a quarter of people with lung cancer in England (25%) will live for a year and less than one in ten (7% in England) will still be alive five years after diagnosis.6,7

“We know if we apply the best standards of care already being demonstrated in some parts of the country, and if we diagnose people early, we can double one year and five year lung cancer survival rates by 2016,” says Dr Mick Peake. “We estimate that nearly 5,000 lives could be saved as a result.”

The UK Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) is a powerful new coalition of the UK’s leading lung cancer experts, senior NHS and Department of Health professionals, charities and healthcare companies. Itis the UK’s largest multi-interest group in lung cancer.  This is the first time that all the major charities with an interest in lung cancer have come together.  www.uklcc.org.uk

-ends-

Picture caption:-

From left to right: Dr Jesme Fox, co-chair of the United Kingdom Lung Cancer Coalition and medical director, Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation, Graham Brady MP (Conservative, Altrincham and Sale West), Rob Wilson MP (Conservative, Reading East), Sir Peter Soulsby MP (Labour, Leicester South), Mark Durkan MP (SDLP, Foyle), Madeleine Moon MP (Labour, Bridgend) and Mark Hunter (Lib Dem, Cheadle)

 

 

The UKLCC Lung Cancer Parliamentary Champions are:-

John Battle MP – Leeds West

Rt Hon Frank Dobson MP – St Pancras

Mark Durkan MP – Foyle

Sharon Hodgson MP – Gateshead East and Washington West

John Leech MP – Manchester Withington

Anne Milton MP – Guildford

MadeleineMoon MP – Bridgend

Sir Peter Soulsby MP – Leicester South

Jo Swinson MP – East Dunbartonshire

Rob Wilson MP – Reading East

 

Note to editors:-

Lung cancer kills over 33,000 people each year – more than breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer and leukaemia combined.3 Around 22,500 men and 15,200 women are diagnosed with lung cancer each year.6 Half of all diagnosed will die within six months.8

 

For further information about Lung Cancer Awareness Month visit: www.macmillan.org.uk or www.roycastle.org

 

For further information and interviews, please contact:- 

Lynsey Conway on 07778 304233, Rachel Ulph on 07958 992185 or Sarah Lee on 0207 340 6203

 

 

References:

 

  1. EUROCARE 3. Cancer survival in Europe: IARC, 2003 (Accessed 14 Suppl 5, athttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14684501&query_hl=1.) and http://www.eurocare.it/
  2. Lung Cancer Research in the UK 2006, Report of the NCRI Strategic Planning Group on Lung Cancer”, October 2006
  3. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/aboutcancer/statistics/mortality

4.    UKfigures extrapolated from Mannino DM, Ford E, Giovono GA & Thun M. ‘Lung cancer deaths in the United States from 1979 to 1992: an analysis using multiple-cause mortality data. Int J Epidemiol 1998; 27: 159-166

5.    http://www.performance.doh.gov.uk/nhsperformanceindicators/2002/hacals_d.html

6.    http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/types/lung/incidence/

7.    One- and five-year survival of patients diagnosed in 1998-2001: 21 common cancers, sex and age, England. 2005. (Accessed at http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Expodata/Spreadsheets/D8982.xls)

8.    Cancer Research UK Statistics Dept 

UKLCC welcomes smoking ban

Press statement

Smoking Vote, House of Commons, 14th February 2006

“The UKLCC is delighted and congratulates all MPs who voted for a

complete ban on smoking in public places. This is a big win for public health – stopping smoking is best way to prevent lung cancer. 

This success doesn’t mean we can take out eye off the ball with

regard to tackling lung cancer.  Despite restrictions on smoking, many thousands of people will still be diagnosed with this major killer.

We call on all politicians to show the same commitment to

improving outcomes for lung cancer patients as they have to restricting smoking in public places.”

-ends-

Note to editors:-

The UK Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) is a powerful new coalition of the UK’s leading lung cancer experts, senior NHS and Department of Health professionals, charities and healthcare companies. Itis the UK’s largest multi-interest group in lung cancer and is committed to doubling one year and five year lung cancer survival.This is the first time that all the major charities with an interest in lung cancer have come together. 

Chair and co-chairs of the UKLCC include:-

·         Dr Mick Peake (Chair) – Consultant Physician, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, NHS National Clinical Lead for Lung Cancer

·         Professor Stephen Spiro (Co-chair) – Head of the Dept of Respiratory Medicine, University College Hospital

·         Dr Jesme Baird (Co-chair) – Director of Patient Care, Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

·         Dr Joe Maguire (Co-chair) – Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Liverpool Lung Cancer Unit

·         Dame Helena Shovelton (Co-chair) – Chief Executive, British Lung Foundation

Charity members include: Cancer Research UK, Macmillan Cancer Relief, Marie Curie Cancer Care, Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation, British Lung Foundation (Secretariat), CancerBACUP

For further information, please contact:- 

Lynsey Conway on 07778 304233 or email@lynseyconway.co.uk

 

Lung cancer the disease – key facts

Bringing lung cancer out of the shadow

Lung cancer – the disease

The UK’s deadliest cancer

Lung cancer is the UK’s biggest cancer killer1; it kills over 33,000 people each year.1 This is more than breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer and leukaemia combined.1

How many people are affected by lung cancer in the UK?

Around 22,700 men and 14,700 women are diagnosed with lung cancer each year.2 The disease accounts for one in 20 of all deaths in the UK,3 one in six of all cancer cases and one in four of all cancer deaths.4It is reported that four people die from lung cancer in the UK every hour.1

Who is at risk?

The majority of lung cancer cases are among smokers (nine out of ten),5 although one in eight of all lung cancer deaths are among people who have never smoked.6 Passive smoking (second-hand smoking), exposure to radon gas, asbestos and other chemicals, together with diet and family history can all increase the risk of developing the disease.5

More women die from lung cancer than breast cancer1 and women smokers are twice as likely to develop the disease than men who smoke.7 Even among non-smokers, women’s risk of developing lung cancer is higher than men – this is thought to be due to genetic factors.7

Lung cancer incidence and mortality rates are strongly associated with deprivation. Lung cancer is two and half times more common in deprived groups than it is affluent ones.4

In terms of geography, Scotland and the North of England have the highest number of lung cancer deaths.4

What is the average survival of someone diagnosed with lung cancer in the UK?

Half of all lung cancer patients die within six months of diagnosis.8 Around a quarter of people with lung cancer in England and Wales(24%)9 will live to one year and less than one in ten (6% in England and Wales) are still alive five years after diagnosis.10 

You are four times more likely to survive from lung cancer in Chelsea, Stockport and Solihull than you are in Northumberland, Rotherham or Sunderland – a result of both socioeconomic and health provision factors.11

How does this compare with other countries?

UKsurvival rates compare poorly with the rest of Europe and United States. According to the Eurocare Study, average five year survival in England is around 7.5 percent compared to a European average of over nine percent12 and a 15 percent average in the United States.13

Why is lung cancer survival in the UK so poor?

Poor survival from lung cancer is a result of a wide variety of factors. These are as follows:

  • uncertainty among people as to when to seek help, not recognizing the symptoms and not seeking help until it is ‘too late’;
  • reluctance to seek help due to the guilt attached to smoking
  • difficulty amongst GPs in identifying suspicious symptoms early enough;
  • time taken to progress from first appointment through to diagnostic tests onto treatment is too lengthy in some areas;
  • a variation in quality and provision of cancer services across the country –  as a result, not all patients are receiving the optimal treatment;
  • decades of under-investment in people and equipment – this includes a shortage of PET scanners in the UK (currently there are only seven PET scanners in England and six of these are based in London and the South East);14
  • lack of screening programmes or research into screening
  • patients in the UK may be generally less healthy and therefore less likely to be fit for such things as major surgery.

-ends-

References:

1.    http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/aboutcancer/statistics/mortality

2.    http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/types/lung/incidence/

3.    http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/college/ceeu/ceeu_lung_home.htm

4.    Cancer Atlas of UK and Ireland, 2005. Chapter 13, p139

5.    http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/types/lung/riskfactors/

6.    UKfigures extrapolated from Mannino DM, Ford E, Giovono GA & Thun M. ‘Lung cancer deaths in the United States from 1979 to 1992: an analysis using multiple-cause mortality data. Int J Epidemiol 1998; 27: 159-166

7.    http://www.lungcancercoalition.org/

8.    Cancer Research UK Statistics Dept

9.    One- and five-year survival of patients diagnosed in 1991-95 and 1996-99: major cancers, sex and age, England and Wales. 2005. (Accessed at http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=10821.)

10.  Coleman M, Rachet B, Woods L, et al.Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in England and Wales up to 2001. British Journal of Cancer 2004; 90.

11.  http://www.performance.doh.gov.uk/nhsperformanceindicators/2002/hacals_d.html

12.  EUROCARE 3. Cancer survival in Europe: IARC, 2003 (Accessed 14 Suppl 5, at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14684501&query_hl=1.)  and http://www.eurocare.it/

13.  Ries LAG, Eisner MP, Kosary CL, et al. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2001. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute; 2004

14.  A Framework for the Development of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Services in England, DOH, October 2005

For further information, please contact:-

Lynsey Conway on 07778 304233

email@lynseyconway.co.uk

What is the UKLCC?

Bringing lung cancer out of the shadow

Facts on the United Kingdom Lung Cancer Coalition

What is the UKLCC?

The UK Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) is a powerful new coalition of the UK’s leading lung cancer experts, senior NHS and Department of Health professionals, charities and healthcare companies. Itis the UK’s largest multi-interest group in lung cancer and it is the first time that all the major charities with an interest in the disease have joined forces to fight lung cancer.  

Lung cancer is the UK’s biggest cancer killer1; it kills over 33,000 people each year1.  This is more than breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer and leukaemia combined.1 Half of all people diagnosed with lung cancer die within six months.2

Why has the UKLCC been established?

The UKLCC has been established to launch the nation’s largest-ever attack on lung cancer and bring lung cancer out of the political, clinical and media shadow.

All members believe that lung cancer research, diagnosis, treatment, public awareness and patient information are currently inadequate in the UK.  

Despite improvements in services, there is a wide variation in survival rates across England. Currently, as a result of socioeconomics and health provision inequalities, you are four times more likely to survive from lung cancer in Chelsea, Stockport and Solihull than you are in Northumberland, Rotherham or Sunderland.3

The UKLCC believes that lung cancer gets a raw deal when compared to other cancers. Despite accounting for a quarter of all cancer deaths,4 lung cancer only receives three per cent of all current UK cancer research funding.5 This is a travesty.

Who are the UKLCC?

The UKLCC consists of a partnership of some of the country’s leading lung cancer experts, senior NHS and Department of Health professionals, charities and healthcare companies who are committed to, and have a shared interest in, improving the survival and quality of life of patients with lung cancer.

Currently, there are 24 members of the UKLCC. They are:-

NHS / Clinical / Professional:

  • Dr Mick Peake, Chairman of Intercollegiate Lung Cancer Group; National Lead Clinician for Lung Cancer, Cancer Services Collaborative; Consultant Physician, University Hospitals of Leicester Trust
  • Dr Stephen Falk, Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre
  • Dr Joe Maguire, Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Liverpool Lung Cancer Unit
  • Professor Stephen Spiro, Head of the Dept of Respiratory Medicine, University College Hospital
  • Mr Richard Steyn, Consultant Thoracic Surgeon, Birmingham Heartlands and Solihull NHS Trust
  • Mr Roger Vaughan, Consultant Thoracic Surgeon, Birmingham Heartlands and Solihull NHS Trust
  • Gilmour Frew, NHS Cancer Services Collaborative ‘Improvement Partnership’
  • General Practice Airways Group (GPiAG)
  • National Lung Cancer Forum for Nurses

Patient Advocacy:

  • British Lung Foundation (Secretariat)
  • Cancer Black Care
  • Cancer Research UK
  • CancerBACUP
  • Macmillan Cancer Relief
  • Marie Curie Cancer Care
  • Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation
  • Tenovus

Companies:

  • AstraZeneca UK Ltd
  • Lilly UK
  • Pierre Fabre
  • Roche Products Ltd
  • sanofi-aventis
  • Unisoft Medical Systems

What are the key aims and objectives of the UKLCC?

The UKLCC’s key objectives are to:-

  • Raise political awareness of lung cancer
  • Raise the general public’s awareness of lung cancer – and especially encourage earlier presentation and symptom recognition
  • Empower patients to take an active part in their care
  • Improve lung cancer services in the UK
  • Increase research funding for lung cancer

By doing so, and by universally adopting the best standards which already exist in the NHS, we believe we can double survival.

What is the UKLCC’s long-term vision?

TheUKLCC is committed to doubling one year lung cancer patient survival by 2010 and five year survival by 2015.  Currently, only around a quarter of people with lung cancer in England and Wales (24%) 6 will live for a year and less than one in ten (6% in England and Wales) are still alive five years after diagnosis.7

How can people contact the UKLCC?

People can contact the UKLCC by visiting our website www.uklcc.org.uk or by contacting the UKLCC Secretariat at uklcc@blf-uk.org. You can also write to the UKLCC at the following address:-

UKLCC Secretariat

C/o British Lung Foundation

73-75 Goswell Road

LondonEC1V 7ER

Tel: 0207 688 5565

-ends-

 

Note to editors:

The UKLCC’s launch activities are being funded by its own membership.

Currently the UKLCC receives benefit in kind from the British Lung Foundation (secretariat and treasury services) and Unisoft Medical Systems (website design) and grants from Unisoft, Pierre Fabre, AstraZeneca, Lilly UK, sanofi-aventis and Roche.

 

For further information, please contact:-

Lynsey Conway on 07778 304233

email@lynseyconway.co.uk

 

 

References:

1              http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/aboutcancer/statistics/mortality

2              Cancer research UK Statistics Dept

3              http://www.performance.doh.gov.uk/nhsperformanceindicators/2002/hacals_d.html

4              Cancer Atlas of UK and Ireland, 2005. Chapter 13, p139

5              http://www.ncri.org.uk/publications/index.cfm?NavSub=20 NCRI Strategic Analysis 2002 pdf

6              One- and five-year survival of patients diagnosed in 1991-95 and 1996-99: major cancers, sex and age, England and Wales. 2005. (Accessed at http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=10821.)

Coleman M, Rachet B, Woods L, et al.Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in England and Wales up to 2001. British Journal of Cancer 2004; 

UKLCC launch press release

LUNG CANCER SURVIVAL CAN DOUBLE INSISTS NEW MEDICAL COALITION

Lung cancer survival rates can be doubled in the next ten years according to a powerful new coalition of leading UK lung cancer experts launched today (7th November).  The first and largest coalition of its kind, the UK Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) believes thousands of lives can be saved as a result.1,2,3

“We know if we apply the best standards of care already being demonstrated in some parts of the country, and if we diagnose people early, we can double one year and five year lung cancer survival rates by 2015,” says Dr Mick Peake, chair of the UKLCC and NHS national clinical lead for lung cancer. “We estimate around 13,000 lives could be saved as a result.”

UKlung cancer survival is one of the worst in Europe4 with half of all people with lung cancer dying within six months.5 Currently, you are four times more likely to survive the disease in some parts of the country than others.6

Biggest killer

Lung cancer is the UK’s biggest cancer killer with someone dying of the disease every 15 minutes.7 More women die from lung cancer than breast cancer7 and one in eight cases of lung cancer are among people who have never smoked.8 According to recent research, half of all people in the UK know someone who has died or been affected by lung cancer.9

“Despite killing a quarter of all UK cancer patients, lung cancer only receives just three percent of the national cancer research budget,” says Professor Stephen Spiro, head of respiratory medicine at University College Hospital, London. “For some reason, lung cancer has not received the attention afforded to the other major cancers. Lung cancer can be cured if we just catch it early enough.”

As well as lobbying to improve services and increase funding, the UKLCC will be working with Government to get a sustained campaign of public awareness underway and improve patient information. The aim is to help people recognize symptoms and seek early diagnosis in order to save lives.

-ends-

Note to editors:-

The UK Lung Cancer Coalition (UKLCC) is a powerful new coalition of the UK’s leading lung cancer experts, senior NHS and Department of Health professionals, charities and healthcare companies. Itis the UK’s largest multi-interest group in lung cancer.  This is the first time that all the major charities with an interest in lung cancer have come together. 

Chair and co-chairs of the UKLCC include:-

·         Dr Mick Peake (Chair) – Consultant Physician, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, NHS National Clinical Lead for Lung Cancer

·         Professor Stephen Spiro (Co-chair) – Head of the Dept of Respiratory Medicine, University College Hospital

·         Dr Jesme Baird (Co-chair) – Director of Patient Care, Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

·         Dr Joe Maguire (Co-chair) – Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Liverpool Lung Cancer Unit

·         Dame Helena Shovelton (Co-chair) – Chief Executive, British Lung Foundation

Charity members include: Cancer Research UK, Macmillan Cancer Relief, Marie Curie Cancer Care, Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation, British Lung Foundation (Secretariat), CancerBACUP

For further information, case studies or images, please contact:- 

Lynsey Conway on 07778 304233, email@lynseyconway.co.uk

References

 

1.    http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/types/lung/incidence/

2.    One- and five-year survival of patients diagnosed in 1991-95 and 1996-99: major cancers, sex and age, England and Wales. 2005. (Accessed at http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=10821.)

3.    Coleman M, Rachet B, Woods L, et al.Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in England and Wales up to 2001. British Journal of Cancer 2004; 90.

4.    EUROCARE 3. Cancer survival in Europe: IARC, 2003 (Accessed 14 Suppl 5, at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14684501&query_hl=1.)  and http://www.eurocare.it/

5.    Cancer Research UK Statistics Dept

6.    http://www.performance.doh.gov.uk/nhsperformanceindicators/2002/hacals_d.html

7.    http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/aboutcancer/statistics/mortality

8.    UKfigures extrapolated from Mannino DM, Ford E, Giovono GA & Thun M. ‘Lung cancer deaths in the United States from 1979 to 1992: an analysis using multiple-cause mortality data. Int J Epidemiol 1998; 27: 159-166

9.    Bringing lung cancer out from the shadow research undertaken on behalf of United Kingdom Lung Cancer Coaliton by GfK NOP Telebus 30th September-2nd October 2005

Contact

UKLCC Secretariat: Red Hot Irons Ltd, Maria House, 1683b, High St, Knowle, Solihull, B93 0LL

Tel: 01675 477605
Email: Info@uklcc.org.uk
Media enquiries only: Call 07778 304233

Legal Notices | Privacy Policy
| Articles of AssociationMemorandum of Association

The UKLCC is a private company limited by guarantee without share capital and incorporated as a Community Interest Company (CIC) registered at Companies House (Registration Number 11914752) and operating throughout the United Kingdom